Category Preschoolers

Dental care for preschoolers
Preschoolers

Dental care for preschoolers

Children's teeth development Baby teeth can arrive in any order, although the central bottom teeth are often first. Most children have a full set of 20 baby teeth by the time they're three years old. Children get teeth at different times. The 32 adult teeth replace the baby teeth between the ages of 6 and 20 years.

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Preschoolers

Preschool bullying: helping your child

Bullying at preschool Bullying can be devastating for children's confidence and self-esteem, especially in the preschool years. If your child is being bullied at preschool, he needs lots of love and support, both at home and at preschool. He also needs to know that you'll take action to prevent any further bullying.
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Preschoolers

Talking and listening to preschoolers

Preschooler talking and listening: what to expect At 3-5 years, you might hear lots of talk and questions from your preschooler. This is because preschoolers: need to practise new words, speech sounds and language skills are constantly fascinated by the world around them learn by talking with people who know more than they do.
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Preschoolers

3-4 years: preschooler development

Child development at 3-4 years: what's happening Feelings This is an important time in your preschooler's emotional development. During this year your child really starts to understand that her body, mind and emotions are her own. She knows the difference between feeling happy, sad, afraid or angry. Your child also shows fear of imaginary things, cares about how others act and shows affection for familiar people.
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Preschoolers

Language development: 3-4 years

Vocabulary and language development in children at 3-4 years Your child learns lots of new words by listening to you and other adults and guessing from context. He also learns from new experiences and from listening to stories read out loud. He'll still understand many more words than he says. Your child will learn and use: more connecting words like 'because', 'and' or 'if' more numbers names for groups of things like 'vegetables' or 'animals' family terms like 'aunty' or 'brother'.
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Preschoolers

Talking and play: preschoolers

What to expect: preschoolers and talking At 3-4 years , your preschooler will probably: be able to ask more complex questions and speak with better but not perfect grammar say sentences with 5-6 words. By five years , your preschooler will probably: be able to say her name and address be able to speak clearly using sentences of up to nine words have meaningful conversations and tell you detailed stories.
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Preschoolers

Preschoolers making friends

Preschoolers making friends: what to expect There's a big range of normal when it comes to preschoolers making friends. By three years , many children are regularly involved in activities with other children - for example, at child care, kinder or playgroup. At this age, some children have a clear idea of who their friends are and can name them.
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Preschoolers

Preschooler creative learning and development: what to expect

Creative play: why it's important for preschooler learning and development The preschool years can be one of the most creative times in a child's life. While your child's imagination is still developing, drama, music, dance, arts and crafts can: foster creativity build your child's confidence help your child express feelings and learn communication skills help your child develop, practise and improve coordination and motor skills give your child a chance to practice decision-making, problem-solving and critical thinking help your child find new ways of looking at things.
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Preschoolers

4-5 years: preschooler development

Preschooler development at 4-5 years: what's happening Feelings and behaviour At this age, your child is exploring and learning to express his emotions. He'll do this in many ways - for example, by talking, using gestures and noises, painting and making things. Your preschooler also likes to be around people.
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Preschoolers

Preschooler behaviour: what to expect

Child behaviour in the preschool years Preschoolers are fascinated by the world around them , so you can expect lots of 'who', 'what' and 'why' questions. You might need to allow more time when you're doing things with your preschooler - for example, so she can stop and look at a bug on the footpath.
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Preschoolers

Healthy food for preschoolers: the five food groups

What is healthy food for kids? Healthy food for preschoolers includes a wide variety of fresh foods from the five healthy food groups : vegetables fruit grain foods reduced-fat dairy protein. Each food group has different nutrients, which your child's body needs to grow and work properly. That's why we need to eat a range of foods from across all five food groups.
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Preschoolers

Childhood sexual behaviour: preschoolers

Preschooler sexual behaviour: what's typical? Sexual behaviour in your preschooler might be a bit confronting, especially the first time you see it. It might help to know that touching, looking at and talking about bodies is a mostly typical and healthy part of your child's development. Open and honest talk about sex and bodies will help you guide your child's behaviour now.
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Preschoolers

Toilet training: a practical guide

Toilet training: signs that your child is ready You might see signs that your child is ready for toilet training from about two years on . Some children show signs of being ready as early as 18 months, and some might be older than two years. Your child is showing signs of being ready if he: is walking and can sit for short periods of time is becoming generally more independent when it comes to completing tasks, including saying 'no' more often is becoming interested in watching others go to the toilet - this can make you uncomfortable, but it's a good way to introduce things has dry nappies for up to two hours - this shows he can store wee in his bladder (which automatically empties in younger babies or newborns) tells you with words or gestures when he does a poo or wee in his nappy - if he can tell you before it happens, he's ready for toilet training begins to dislike wearing a nappy, perhaps trying to pull it off when it's wet or soiled has regular, soft, formed bowel movements can pull his pants up and down can follow simple instructions like 'Give the ball to daddy' shows understanding about things having their place around the home.
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Preschoolers

Good apps, games, TV shows, movies and YouTube for preschoolers

Why screen time quality is important The quality of screen time matters. For preschoolers, good-quality screen time has benefits in two key areas: learning behaviour. Good-quality screen time can support your child's learning, especially if it ties in with his interests or sparks his imagination. For example, a five-year-old can get a lot out of drawing or painting on a screen because this develops his ability to use shape and colour in imaginative ways.
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Preschoolers

Choosing the best movies for your child

Best movies for kids and teens: how our reviews help you choose Our reviews provide a more in-depth description of movie content than the standard rating system . They do this by looking at: violent material scenes and themes that children might find disturbing sexual references nudity product placement coarse language use of substances.
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Preschoolers

Preschool: how it works and why it's good

Why are preschool programs good for your child? Preschool helps children: get new knowledge and skills - for example, they start learning more about numbers, letters and words improve their communication and social skills through playing and interacting with other children and adults make new friends and develop new relationships with adults develop physical skills - for example, children learn to balance on play equipment and practise fine motor skills like drawing with a pencil and cutting with scissors develop problem-solving and creative thinking skills develop responsibility, independence, confidence and self-worth through doing things like looking after their own belongings and spending time away from home get ready for the transition to school.
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Preschoolers

Imagining, creating and play: preschoolers

What to expect as your preschooler's imagination grows From around three years your child might enjoy dramatic play using puppets and dress-ups, tell you very detailed stories about things that never happened, or have an imaginary friend. She might pretend to be a grown-up, a doctor or an astronaut. Dress-ups and pretend play let children explore ideas about the real world in a safe environment.
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Preschoolers

Preschoolers at play

Play and games for preschoolers: what to expect All children are different, and they all have individual likes and dislikes when it comes to play. But preschoolers generally love the following kinds of play: Dramatic and pretend play : preschoolers use games like dress-ups to act out confusing or scary scenarios, try out different roles like being a mum or a dad, and explore emotions.
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Preschoolers

Thinking and play: preschoolers

About preschooler play and cognitive development Preschoolers want to learn how things work, and they learn best through play. Children at play are solving problems, creating, experimenting, thinking and learning all the time. This is why play supports your preschooler's cognitive development - that is, your child's ability to think, understand, communicate, remember, imagine and work out what might happen next.
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Preschoolers

Movement and play: preschoolers

Daily movement for preschoolers: why it's important Movement is important for your child's learning, health and wellbeing. Daily movement helps your child build muscles and practise physical skills. Her confidence will grow as she climbs higher, runs faster and jumps further. Play is one of the main ways that children learn and develop, so everyday play is the best way to get your preschooler moving.
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